The 5th Wave and The Infinite Sea by Rick Yancey

The 5th Wave (The 5th Wave, #1)The 5th Wave by Rick Yancey

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

I picked up The 5th Wave because it was yet another young adult dystopian fiction novel and I’m always looking for ‘sure things’ for the teens in my secondary school library. So I fully expected it to be predictable and smug about it. But it wasn’t! The twists and turns in the plot were unexpected and juicy! Our main character Cassie’s own biases and anxiety cloud her reliability as a narrator. From the start to the finish, I had a beautiful visual movie playing in my head so I can’t wait to see it come to the screen in 2016. I’ll be sure to pick the sequel as well.

The Infinite Sea (The 5th Wave, #2)    The Infinite Sea by Rick Yancey

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

The Infinite Sea begins in media res as Cassie and her band of friends must pick themselves up from their last good deed in The 5th Wave. Having loved and lost Evan, Cassie’s emotions seem to be still divided between her brother and this new found will she has to see through the survival of the human race. Like the first book, The Infinite Sea keeps the reader guessing about the true ambitions of the invading alien race and there is a lot of action and many of the characters waffle between wanting to survive, and also making giant sacrifices to save each other.

Yancey never lets the reader forget that this group of hardened soldiers are actually brainwashed children who are living a nightmare. He mingles strategy with really human moments and I could not stop turning pages. I found both books to be very accessible despite the science fiction elements which require a leap of acceptance. The lexile count for both books is low enough for grade 6, and the characters are all school ages. I expect that these books will have wide appeal for most intermediate and senior students in my secondary school library.

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Rush by Eve Silver

Rush (The Game, #1)Rush by Eve Silver

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Eve Silver‘s book Rush is a sure fire winner with the strong young adult readers in my secondary school library. It begins with the life of an otherwise ordinary girl who gets pulled through dimensions into a ‘game’ but it turns out that she actually has to really kill the enemy Drau that she is up against. Miki ‘levels up’ as she becomes less afraid to hunt the Drau. There are hints at deeper issues as Miki deals with her own shock to the intensity of her situation, and as she tries to make a connection with the elusive leader Jackson, who has put up emotional walls to deal with his responsibility to the game. Because of the twists and turns in world-building and planar leaps, I don’t recommend this to weaker readers, but for those into science fiction, I do. I really enjoyed the game culture and also how Miki and her friends have to maintain all ‘normal’ appearances when they’re not fighting for their lives.

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Trillium by Jeff Lemire

TrilliumTrillium by Jeff Lemire

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Jeff Lemire ‘s graphic novel reminds me of this version of Madeleine L’Engle’s A Wrinkle in Time: The Graphic Novel. As Nika and William come together through time and space and then are separated again, Lemire presents this as happening on two separate planes of existence. He uses the mythology of Mayan temples and an alien race to hint that these two people need to meet. The message is not explicit, but Lemire hints that these disparate people are meant to be together. The layout of the novel, which switches voices and combines the two planes of existence in unusual but effective ways is another convention-breaking strategy of Lemire’s to build the story. Although Trillium is rated by Vertigo as “Suggested for Mature Readers” there is no content or visualization that is beyond the capability of the adolescent readers in my secondary school library. More so what will challenge them are the style of the layout, and the topics of time, space and spirituality. Personally, I can’t wait for them to read it so we can have those great conversations.

weirdest-burp-ever

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Every Day by David Levithan

Every Day (Every Day, #1)Every Day by David Levithan

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

If you think that all young adult fiction is about dystopias and shallow relationships, give Every Day a try. I found it really impressive that Levithan could carry this unusual format through the entire book. At first I was quite worried that the days would become preachy as every new body protagonist A inhabits has an identity that is less about humans and more about Levithan’s need to celebrate diversity …and there were very few days that came across this way. It reminded me both of Orlando: A Biographyand also Black Like Me in its scifi but humanistic approach to becoming an “other”. I will highly recommend this book to the teens in my secondary school library.

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Saga by Brian K. Vaughan, Fiona Staples

Saga, Volume 1Saga, Volume 1 by Brian K. Vaughan

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

I find it amazing how quickly Brian Vaughan’s characters can be developed in this short graphic novel. As usual, Vaughan’s visual aesthetic does not disappoint. However because there are about 4 pages of nudity and sexuality that are outside the limitations of my secondary school library’s audience, I cannot include it in my collection. Too bad because it’s a really good story and I look forward to reading the next volume.

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Cinder by Marissa Meyer

Cinder (The Lunar Chronicles, #1)Cinder by Marissa Meyer

My rating: 3 of 5 stars

As much as I wanted to get into this book about a Cyborg with way more problems than Cinderella (who the book loosely resembles), I had trouble with the world-building and the flow of unfolding the politics of this fantastic setting. I had trouble understanding why she wanted the respect of her really mean stepmother. The unintentional relationship that forms between Cinder and Prince Kai seems too natural given the differences in their statuses. There’s barely enough time to realize that Cinder’s true identity will give her an edge in her battle of wills against the threatening Lunars, before she’s asked to make big life decisions. As the reader, I felt more confused by the local politics. Maybe Meyer has too many subplots or maybe she was asked to cut out 100 vital pages, but I felt leaving dissatisfied. I’m not sure that I will pick up the next one.

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A Wrinkle in Time: The Graphic Novel adapted and illustrated by Hope Larson

A Wrinkle in Time: The Graphic NovelA Wrinkle in Time: The Graphic Novel by Hope Larson

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

I am at a disadvantage in reading the graphic novel version of A Wrinkle in Time because I don’t remember the original story enough to compare it.  The only thing I do remember is “It was a dark and stormy night…”.  At the same time, I have the advantage of reading the graphic novel fresh for the first time and I thoroughly enjoyed it.  I found the illustrations in black, white and blue to highlight the surreal and stark settings as well as give a reminiscent feeling to the tale.  My favourite illustration in the book is on page 296 when Meg is entering the dark thing, but her father’s hand is reaching through the frame to pull her back.  The abstract combination of lines meeting Meg’s limbs somehow conveys that her soul in as much jeopardy as her body. I think this drawing of Hope Larson’s would make Picasso proud.

The story itself reminds me of The Root Cellar by Janet Lunn and The Magician’s Nephew by C.S. Lewis.  I don’t know if I’ve ever read a book that hinted at the mathematics and physics behind time travel theory as much as A Wrinkle in Time.  I’m also surprised how much spirituality is hinted at through references to the Bible and other philosophical works.  I suppose the spiritual questioning of Meg is why most of all this book reminds me of Le Petit Prince by Antoine de Saint-Exupery.  This graphic novel version of A Wrinkle in Time is already part of my secondary school library collection and now I’m glad that I’ll be able to recommend it.

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