Code in Every Class by Kevin Brookhauser and Ria Megnin

Code in Every ClassCode in Every Class by Kevin Brookhouser

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

A powerful little read that zips by. Although I’m personally working on my entry-level Lightbot skills, I really like how Kevin Brookhouser opens up with pseudo-coding activities to create a coding mindset and then works towards more and more challenging materials. The appendices filled with resources will be something that I return to again and again.

I’ll look forward to Kevin’s next book as he will hopefully design a continuum within each of the coding languages to help us again. I’m left with questions that lead me to think that there must be a tipping point when it becomes an embedded part of school culture, but I wonder if this needs to be taught or if curiosity will develop with the right atmosphere and opportunity.

It reminded me a lot of another small but powerful book that transformed my teaching practice: The Socially Networked Classroom: Teaching In The New Media Age

I have been really glad that I could rely on our TeachOntario community as we worked through the book together in our book club.

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#BIT15Reads: Geek Sublime by Vikram Chandra

Geek Sublime: The Beauty of Code, the Code of BeautyGeek Sublime: The Beauty of Code, the Code of Beauty by Vikram Chandra
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

In Vikram Chandra’s final words of Geek Sublime: The Beauty of Code, the Code of Beauty, he says: “Makers tend to fetishize tools that they use successfully, and computer geeks are no exception—hackers will tell you in exacting detail about the first computer they ever used, the first program they ever wrote…All cognition is re-cognition, recognition; discover and rediscovery are both nourishing.” Chandra’s exploration of his love of both writing fiction and coding is complex but the way that he weaves in sociological research of culture and language and their effect on modern coding is mesmerizing. There were moments of code and computer science when he almost lost me, but then he appealed to my humanities’ nature with deep analysis of machismo in coding culture or the deconstruction of ancient Sanskrit poetry. I’m not sure what to take away from Geek Sublime, but I thoroughly enjoyed the ride.

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